The Best RV Upgrades You Should Make After Purchase | RV Upgrade Ideas

The Best RV Upgrades You Should Make After Purchase | RV Upgrade Ideas

FIVE OF THE BEST RV UPGRADES YOU’LL EVER MAKE  (RIGHT AFTER YOU MAKE YOUR NEW RV PURCHASE)

Don’t let that new RV smell fool you. While your “new home on wheels” may have checked off a lot of items on your camping wish list, many RV manufacturers skimp on some important details that you’ll wish they hadn’t. After a few trips in your camper, there’s a good chance you’ll want to make these five RV upgrades …

FLIP. FLOP. SWAP. THE RV MATTRESS REPLACEMENT.

After a few nights of tossing and turning on a “stock” mattress, many new RV owners quickly begin the search for an RV mattress replacement. Unfortunately, most local mattress retailers do not sell RV mattresses because of the varying dimensions. In fact, when you begin shopping for a replacement, you’ll want to be armed with dimensions. (For the most accurate numbers, measure the platform that your existing mattress rests on.)

Next, determine which type of mattress upgrade you’re willing to invest in — a $150-$300 foam mattress, a $399-$799 memory foam RV mattress, a $599-999 latex RV mattress or a $1,100-$2,000 RV air mattress. An RV memory foam mattress topper is an even more economical solution, and these toppers can be cut to size. Mattress Insider manufactures RV mattresses that pair with a long list of RV makes and models. (After you get done replacing your mattress, you might want to check out Quick Zip’s patented zip-on RV sheets, which eliminates the daily struggle of making the bed in tight camper confines.

THE NEXT UPGRADE. THE RV AC AIR FILTER REPLACEMENT.

The thin foam air filter on your RV is really only designed to keep debris out of the cooling unit, not out of your interior. In fact, these filters do little to nothing to help purify the air you’re breathing, which can be a problem when you’re camping because the exposure to allergens greatly increases due to the nature of … well, nature.

That’s where RV Air’s RV AC air filter replacement comes in handy. This patent-pending air filter system captures particles as small as 3-10 microns, including dust, pollen, mold spore, and other allergens. The newest generation of RV Air filters features a MERV 8 rating thanks to 40 layers of unwoven polyester that are sprayed with an anti-microbial tackifier to capture microscopic particles.

Less than $20, it’s a small price to pay for truly fresh air. Plus, the RV Air shopping and installation experience is an easy one. Simply match your AC grill, buy the filter at Walmart, Camping World, or online, and then, attach the filter case over the AC’s intake vent using the provided two-sided tape. After that, breathe easy.

SPEAKING OF FILTERS … YOU’LL WANT TO FILTER YOUR RV WATER, TOO.

If you’re a first-time RVer, you’ll quickly find nothing compares to the taste of RV tap water … unless, of course, you’re comparing it to a mouthful of hose water. After a sip, this will be next on your list of immediate RV upgrades. Simply purchase a portable pitcher, like the Brita Slim or the gravity-fed Berkey Water Filter, or opt to buy an in-line filter, which attaches at the entry point of the water supply. Camco and Culligan are popular RV water filter brands.

THE COVETED RV SHOWERHEAD UPGRADE.

If you pay your local RV store a visit, you might notice there’s usually an aisle devoted to an array of showerheads. The reason … most RVs are equipped with a plastic shower head that fails to deliver good pressure, flow, and conservation. Moreover, the equipped shower head is often leaky. Popular replacement brands include Oxygenics or Ecocamel, both favored for their quality and reliability. Also, look for a shower head replacement that has a switch on the side, allowing you to easily shut off water flow to conserve water mid-shower.

LAST BUT NOT LEAST, UPGRADE YOUR BAGGAGE DOOR LOCKS.

Did you know most RV manufacturers use the same generic key across all baggage door locks? Yep, you read that correctly. Most RVers hold the key to your RV storage compartment. In fact, if your key is stamped with CH751, then you’re among the majority of RV owners with the same master key. Consider re-keying your existing locks, or swap to combi-locks. Similar to the factory storage locks, these locks are cam-style, but they use a customizable combination instead of a key.